Fight for Our Nation’s Veterans

On Monday Carl attended the Memorial Day Event at the Santa Fe National Cemetery.  Hundreds of people attended from all over the state to honor our military and those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation’s safety and freedom.

While we have Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day to recognize our men and women who serve us, we must also appreciate them on a daily basis.  Veterans and their families need the support from our communities to help them adjust back to civilian life. Their skills and discipline make them a perfect fit for many job opportunities here.

There are many veterans among us in our Northern New Mexico Communities.  Take the time to say “Thank you” for everything they have done for us and our nation.

Now’s our time to fight for those that fight for us!

Fight for Our Nation’s Veterans

I’m supporting Carl Trujillo because…

I worked for the State of New Mexico for over 20 years. During this time I’ve headed a number of government posts, including the Director of Child Support Services, Director for Administrative Services and Inspector General for the State Human Services Department.

Like Carl, Mayor David Coss is a good friend of mine. And my family will continue to support him as our Mayor. Yet the clear-cut conflict of interest that accompanies holding two elected offices is too much for me to support. It is fundamentally wrong; I strongly believe that a citizen should only hold one elected office, anything more than that threatens our democracy.

During my time in State Government, I dealt with many elected officials, some good, some bad. I have complete confidence that Carl Trujillo will represent District 46 with honesty, fairness and compassion. Carl Trujillo will continue to fight for openness and transparency in Government and he will always put the voices of our communities first and foremost. I’ve always been impressed with Carl’s work ethic and I know that he will be a tireless voice in the Roundhouse for the communities and families of District 46.

Ben Silva

Another great Listening Party!

This weekend Carl attended yet another listening party at the home of a community member.  

We’ve been attending these parties throughout the campaign — small groups of people gathering in homes and sharing their thoughts on what’s working and not working with state government.  And though Carl does take a few minutes to introduce himself and talk a bit about what he stands for, the main focus for all of these events has been on you. Your thoughts, your ideas, your concerns.  That’s the kind of candidate Carl is and that’s the kind of legislator he’ll be — the kind that listens to the needs and ideas of the people and carries those ideas to the floor of the legislature where they can really make a difference in making our community better, healthier and more inclusive.

At this particular party, people shared their ideas and concerns on everything from making our schools better to preserving our acequias.

There’s still a little bit of time to host a Listening Party of your own — if you’re interested, or if you have any ideas of your own you’d like to share with our Campaign for Change, we’re always here to listen.  699-7717 or campaign@CarlTrujillo.com.

The Journal North Endorses Our Campaign for Change!

We’re happy to announce that the Journal North has endorsed our Campaign for Change. So far, two out of three of the major newspapers in our community have endorsed our campaign, and even the New Mexican, which endorsed our opponent, called Carl and “appealing” and “talented” candidate with “roots deep in the north, he understands the culture and ways of rural Santa Fe County” and expressed serious concern with Mayor Coss’ desire to hold two elected offices at the same time.


Here’s the full text of the endorsement:
In this hotly contested, two-way race, one candidate has the backing of the Democratic “establishment” and the endorsement of the retiring incumbent, veteran House Speaker Ben Lujan, who has served in the Legislature since 1975.
 The other, Carl Trujillo, is the young upstart who almost defeated Lujan in the last election. As in so many other races in northern New Mexico, the June 5 Democratic primary is the deciding arena — no Republican is running in this heavily Democratic district.
 Trujillo has his own political connections — one of his uncles currently represents Santa Fe in the Legislature. He has deep roots in Nambé, just like Lujan. With that background, we’d have expected Trujillo to be more inured to the contentiousness of political campaigning, and to have been more willing to join the fray. Instead, he’s absented himself from most of the campaign’s public forums, for which his opponent rightly criticizes him.
 But Trujillo has some reason to be disgruntled with the Democratic Party establishment. He came within 80 votes of defeating Lujan in the 2010 election, suggesting that he has a real understanding of, and popularity in, the Pojoaque Valley that still comprises most of the newly redrawn district. Nevertheless, Lujan and his son, U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Lujan, are endorsing Coss.
 Trujillo has been a small-business entrepreneur since early adulthood and still runs a home building company. He pursued an education in engineering and then went to work in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s materials science division, where he has stayed for more than 20 years. He’s active in his community, having served as coach for any number of sports.
 A life-long Democrat, Trujillo generally follows the party line on most of the issues. But his independence from insiders in a party lately associated with numerous public corruption rackets both large and small encourages us and, as the 2010 election results showed, also strikes a chord with District 46 voters.

Elect Trujillo and break from the past

Community member Will Schmitt explains why, even though he’s a personal friend of our opponent, he still supports Carl–largely due to his concerns about Coss’ two-office power grab and history of ethical problems. You can read the full article below or on the New Mexican site here:

I joined Carl Trujillo’s campaign to win the District 46 seat in the state House of Representatives several months ago, before Mayor David Coss announced his candidacy.

I decided to do this because I fundamentally dislike the level of corruption that appears to surround retiring House Speaker Ben Luján. I met Trujillo and liked what he had to say about issues that I am concerned about as a liberal Democrat, such as the environment, education, immigration, health care, women’s rights, and the economy and its relation to all of the above.

When Coss announced his bid for the seat, I almost quit the Trujillo campaign because I have known Coss to represent many of the things that I like about Carl Trujillo. I decided to stay with the Trujillo campaign after considering whose horse Coss hitched his wagon to. If Coss wins, I believe he will be obligated to Speaker Luján. Coss is surrounded by controversies like the suppression of the cost of the annexation before the recent bond election, the evolving parking-meter scandal, campaign money from Advantage Asphalt, and most recently, the $5 million borrowed to buy and renovate space in the Railyard for city office space that many see as a sweetheart deal to bail out a developer, as well as his intention to keep his job as mayor should he win the election.

All of this looks like business as usual in the Democratic Party and in Santa Fe, and yet we Dems wonder why our base is eroding in New Mexico. This was described very succinctly by Orlando Romero in his May 29 column, “It’s hard to be a Democrat.”

I am convinced that Trujillo will make the best legislator representing our interests. He is smart, honest, energetic and genuinely concerned. He can be trusted to serve our common good as an honest broker. 

Trujillo represents a clean shift from the past, and I give him my enthusiastic endorsement.

Standing up for Inclusiveness

Campaign Manager Faith McKenna “My View” was recently published in the New Mexican in response to our opponent’s smear campaign. You can read the full article below or that the New Mexican website here:

Regarding Marcos Trujillo’s May 14 letter, “keeping company,” that calls me an “out-of-state operative” who has “worked with Republicans”: 

First, it’s important to note that Trujillo conveniently fails to disclose that he’s our opponent’s, Mayor David Coss’, campaign treasurer, so his letter isn’t a letter from some ordinary citizen expressing a concern. It’s part of an ongoing dishonest smear campaign.

As to his “accusations,” as Carl Trujillo’s campaign manager, I have never made a secret of working with candidates and groups on both sides of the aisle, from Republicans to progressives, who sought a more respectful, more inclusive way to engage in our political process. I believe that my work and the work of others who try to build bridges, not walls, represent the best of what our democracy can be — dialogue instead of argument, collaboration instead of combat.

Hyperpartisan political rhetoric already demonizes people just because of their political affiliations. Now it seems we’ve moved to a new level of intolerance and bigotry that demonizes people for even associating with people who have ideas we don’t agree with. How very sad for our democracy if we’re not even allowed to communicate with anyone who doesn’t share our point of view.

Also, this is exactly the sort of partisan nastiness and bigotry that drives good, honest people out of the political process. The more we leave things to the Swift Boat campaigns, the Karl Roves, Koch brothers and the Marcos Trujillos of the world, the less likely it is that good people like Carl Trujillo and his supporters will be willing to be part of the process.

But come to think of it, maybe that was the real agenda behind Marcos Trujillo’s letter, to discourage anyone besides the career politicians and their cronies from participating in our government. How very sad that would be in a city that calls itself progressive. As to the “out-of-state” part, I certainly can’t claim to have been part of this community for 400 years like Carl Trujillo’s family can, but I did grow up in New Mexico and have lived in Santa Fe since 2007.


New Mexican columnist comments on Coss’ robo-calls

Orlando Romero of the Santa Fe New Mexican believes Coss’ robo-calls to be improper and disrespectful of the Hispanic community. You can read the full article below or at the New Mexican website here:

For any Northern New Mexican as old as I am and, for that matter, any young progressive Democrat who has “Occupy Movement” sympathies and is confronted with the terms “Democratic Party establishment” or “the machine,” it is synonymous with the same-old, same-old. In other words, the same old party hacks who would control your future through the pay-for-play tactics of powerful lobbyists would be back in power.

A friend called me recently and asked what Carl Trujillo stands for. The issues seem fuzzy. I wanted to say, excuse me, the main issue in this state is corruption — political shenanigans, bullying, abuse of power — what issue could be more important than that to the health of a true democracy? For years, this state has been run by Democrats, especially up north, who act more like Hugo Chávez than true representative government. Why do you think Gov. Susana Martinez won?

My last column, in which I stated that it’s become an embarrassment to say one is a Democrat in Northern New Mexico, drew an enormous number of responses to my email address. Yet, few of them appeared as letters in this section. That in itself should tell you something. Are they afraid of reprisals? Then, as I was writing this column, I get the same robo-call poll from the David Coss Democratic machine that I’ve answered before. But the most amazing thing is that the poll begins with the question, “Do you support Gov. Martinez’s denial of driver’s licenses to illegal aliens?” What in the world does that have to do with the race between Coss and Trujillo? Is it implying that Trujillo is a conservative? It’s a totally unethical question, especially in regard to the subsequent questions.

For example, the robo poll asks: “Do you have a favorable impression of Coss; press one if yes. Do you have a favorable impression of Trujillo; press one if yes.” Then there’s this winner. It asks, “Some people have an unfavorable opinion of Coss being both mayor and state representative; do you have a favorable or unfavorable opinion; press one,” etc., etc., etc. Then to the most obnoxious question: “If you are Hispanic, press one; if you are Anglo press two.”

I have had this robo call before, but it never mentioned this conflict-of-interest question, so obviously the Democratic political “machine” must be feeling the heat. But what really is offensive to me is the ethnic card. Is it saying or asking if Anglos are more concerned with democracy than Hispanics or that Hispanics are less capable of understanding a democracy? Shame on you Miss Robo Call operator. I am an American — my ancestors have been here since 1598 — and I find your poll truly offensive!

By the way, look who is getting the big bucks and who they are getting them from. Trujillo, as a progressive, should be congratulated. He promised he would not take big-money contributions from lobbyists and political action committees. “His campaign finance report shows he hasn’t,” as reported by this same newspaper, which failed to endorse him. Let me ask you. Isn’t that a real issue? Isn’t the fact that Trujillo is not beholden to anyone a real issue? What more do you want in a representative? What you want in a representative is “a citizen candidate, not a career politician,” as Trujillo has said on nmpolitics.net, and “I’m seeking to represent the people, not govern them.”

Maybe the better word would have been “lord” over them, as many of these career politicians think they are feudal lords. And that we, as peasants, should follow their every whim, especially when it comes to the distribution of pork and other political favors. By the way, at the time this column was written, it was announced that investigative TV reporter Larry Barker was going to do an exposé on “pork” in New Mexico politics. Obviously, this issue of who’s getting the pork is still haunting New Mexico politics.

Maybe the real issue is the trouble with Coss wanting to hold two elected positions. As professor Lonna Atkeson, director of The University of New Mexico Center for the Study of Voting, Elections and Democracy has stated, it is”not fair” and “fundamentally problematic.”

The Journal North Endorses Our Campaign for Change!

We’re happy to announce that the Journal North has endorsed our Campaign for Change. So far, two out of three of the major newspapers in our community have endorsed our campaign, and even the New Mexican, which endorsed our opponent, called Carl and “appealing” and “talented” candidate with “roots deep in the north, he understands the culture and ways of rural Santa Fe County” and expressed serious concern with Mayor Coss’ desire to hold two elected offices at the same time.

Here’s the full text of the endorsement:

In this hotly contested, two-way race, one candidate has the backing of the Democratic “establishment” and the endorsement of the retiring incumbent, veteran House Speaker Ben Lujan, who has served in the Legislature since 1975.

 The other, Carl Trujillo, is the young upstart who almost defeated Lujan in the last election. As in so many other races in northern New Mexico, the June 5 Democratic primary is the deciding arena — no Republican is running in this heavily Democratic district.

 Trujillo has his own political connections — one of his uncles currently represents Santa Fe in the Legislature. He has deep roots in Nambé, just like Lujan. With that background, we’d have expected Trujillo to be more inured to the contentiousness of political campaigning, and to have been more willing to join the fray. Instead, he’s absented himself from most of the campaign’s public forums, for which his opponent rightly criticizes him.

 But Trujillo has some reason to be disgruntled with the Democratic Party establishment. He came within 80 votes of defeating Lujan in the 2010 election, suggesting that he has a real understanding of, and popularity in, the Pojoaque Valley that still comprises most of the newly redrawn district. Nevertheless, Lujan and his son, U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Lujan, are endorsing Coss.

 Trujillo has been a small-business entrepreneur since early adulthood and still runs a home building company. He pursued an education in engineering and then went to work in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s materials science division, where he has stayed for more than 20 years. He’s active in his community, having served as coach for any number of sports.

 A life-long Democrat, Trujillo generally follows the party line on most of the issues. But his independence from insiders in a party lately associated with numerous public corruption rackets both large and small encourages us and, as the 2010 election results showed, also strikes a chord with District 46 voters.

Carl On KSWV

Always happy for opportunities to reach out and engage with the people of our community, Carl was at KSWV in Santa Fe for a live interview last week.  Here’s some of what he talked about regarding the importance of having a state representative who listens to the needs and ideas of the people over his own personal agenda:

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